Blu-Ray Review: The Possession Of Michael King

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: Blu-Ray, DVD/Blu-Ray Reviews, Horror, Movie Reviews, Movies, Reviews |

By Brad Henderson

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David Jung is a first time director/writer who has brought his first feature to the table with The Possession Of Michael King. Jung did a hell of a job with his first film and I’m excited to see what he does next, but sadly, I wasn’t the biggest fan of this flick.

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DVD Review: Blood Soaked

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: DVD, DVD/Blu-Ray Reviews, Horror, Movie Reviews, Movies, Reviews |

By Brad Henderson

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There are quite a few films that don’t get much attention these days. Between big-budget blockbusters and higher budget indies, these B-movies just get shoved to the side. There are a few companies sweeping these films up and giving them the time of day and Wild Eye Releasing is one of them.

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Blu-Ray Review: Graduation Day

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: Blu-Ray, DVD/Blu-Ray Reviews, Horror, Movie Reviews, Movies, Retrovirus, Reviews |

By Brad Henderson

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Back in the day Troma purchased a lot of films from different companies who were going out of business to build up their catalogue. Yes, Troma’s name is all over the old DVD and their logo is on the back on this Blu-Ray but Troma didn’t have anything to do with the making of the film. I only say this because the streak that Troma has isn’t a very good one. Luckily. we have Vinegar Syndrome who is going through Troma’s catalogue and pulling the good flicks out of the depths of their toilet and giving them a proper release.

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Movie Review: Honeymoon

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: Feminism, Horror, Movie Reviews, Movies, Reviews, Science Fiction |

By Less Lee Moore

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Leigh Janiak’s first directorial effort, Honeymoon, wants very much to successfully blend the feel of an indie dramedy with science fiction films like Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Unfortunately, it doesn’t succeed in either capacity.

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Blu-Ray: Locke

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: Blu-Ray, Current Faves, DVD/Blu-Ray Reviews, Movie Reviews, Movies, Reviews |

By Brad Henderson

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Sometimes I will look at a film differently depending on how it is made, obstacles that were overcome during production, or something as seemingly insignificant as maybe a story behind it. I wouldn’t say Locke falls under any of the categories but it is a film that stands out from the rest.

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Music Review: Voyag3r, Doom Fortress

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Horror, Movie Reviews, Movies, Music, Reviews, Science Fiction |

By Jeffery X Martin

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Owing as much to Emerson, Lake and Palmer as they do to John Carpenter and Fabio Frizzi, Detroit instrumental synth-rockers Voyag3r (pronounced “Voyager Three”), create harrowing sci-fi soundtracks for non-existent films. Their first full-length release is called Doom Fortress, and it is precisely as happy as it sounds.

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Music Review: The Low Countries, A Prize Every Time – The Greatest Bits

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Melissa Bratcher

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There’s something to be said for Sunday morning music: the music you put on because the hangover hat is so heavy you can’t raise your head, or the music that goes nicely with coffee and the Sunday paper. The Low Countries’ Greatest Hits compilation A Prize Every Time – The Greatest Bits is truly a Sunday morning record. It’s quiet; it’s packed with tidy, short songs; and is so restrained that it is almost painful. An Anglo-Flemish duo comprised of Nigel Parrington and Els D’hooge, The Low Countries have been turning out twee, thinky, folky music since 2007 and A Prize Every Time gives a nice overview of their brand of ever-so-gentle music.

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Music Review: Better Than Ezra, All Together Now

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Jeffery X Martin

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Better Than Ezra deserves credit for being one of the few bands to make it through the Nineties with their personnel and integrity intact. Lead singer Kevin Griffin has one of the most recognizable voices in the business and the band’s standard blend of light ska and clever catchy choruses is time-tested and successful. At the very least, Better Than Ezra has always been less painful to listen to than Train.

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Music Review: Sloan, Commonwealth

Published on September 12th, 2014 in: Canadian Content, Current Faves, Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Melissa Bratcher

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Roughly a million years ago, or probably closer to 12, my new friend Dave and I were chatting with Sloan’s Andrew Scott after a show and Dave asked if perhaps one day Sloan might do something like KISS did in 1978: each member release a solo album at the same time and they could have matching covers and see whose sells the best. Andrew replied, laconically, “Oh, Jay would fucking love that.” (I’m not paraphrasing there; I’m pretty sure that’s what he said exactly.)

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New Country for Old Men: Kenny Chesney, “American Kids”

Published on September 5th, 2014 in: Music, New Country For Old Men |

By Jeffery X Martin

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As I’ve said before, country music is a train wreck, a big one, where you can’t identify the body parts because they’ve been replaced by twisted steel and tiny fragments of seats and gears. Everything is all jumbled together and, unless you’ve happened to luck onto some old stuff, you can’t tell the country from the can’t-ry.

So why do I still listen?

Hope.

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