Music Review: Brian Reitzell, Hannibal Original Television Soundtrack Seasons 1 & 2

Published on September 26th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Music, Music Reviews, Reviews, Soundtracks and Scores, TV |

By Less Lee Moore

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Fans of both Hannibal Lecter and Brian Reitzell will be thrilled by the recent release of nearly five hours of music from the soundtrack to what may become known as the most compelling interpretation of Thomas Harris’s iconic character, NBC’s Hannibal. With 27 tracks, one representing each episode from both seasons (and an extra track highlighting some of the music in Season 2′s killer finale), there is much to absorb here. Even those who have never seen the show, or who have perhaps avoided it because they can’t imagine anything living up to Anthony Hopkins’s cinematic portrayal, will be seduced by the exquisite sounds contained within this collection.

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Music Review: Merchandise, After The End

Published on September 26th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Less Lee Moore

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O nostalgia is just a looking glass
It’s for us to distort and mold
Won’t someone please help me
I’m too young to feel this old.
Merchandise, “Looking Glass Waltz”

The first track on Merchandise’s new album is called “Corridor,” a stunning instrumental track that feels like the introduction to a concept album. While After The End is anything but, it’s not a stretch to imagine the band tackling something like that one day. They’re full of surprises.

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Music Review: Thank You Scientist, Maps Of Non-Existent Places

Published on September 26th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Tyler Hodg

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In a world with so many options, how does one decide on what genre to listen to? Well, “thank” Thank You Scientist for finding a solution to that problem. Categorizing this band isn’t easy and simply isn’t worth the effort. With the re-release of their album Maps Of Non-Existent Places, Thank You Scientist proves that you don’t need to be bound by genre, but by passion and creativity.

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Music Review: Tony Bennett & Lady Gaga, Cheek To Cheek

Published on September 26th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Feminism, Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Tyler Hodg

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Tony Bennett is a clock that keeps on ticking. His career has spanned over 65 years and he shows no signs of slowing down. For his 57th studio album (!!), Bennett calls upon a familiar friend—Lady Gaga—to record a duet album of jazz standards titled Cheek To Cheek. What initially seems like an unlikely pairing is in fact something incredibly special; listening to this album is a reminder of how great these two artists truly are.

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Music Review: Laetitia Sadier, Something Shines

Published on September 26th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Feminism, Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Melissa Bratcher

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On her third solo album, Stereolab’s Laetitia Sadier treads her accustomed ground, while also shaking things up. Something Shines sounds like a Stereolab record, with space rock, jittering ‘60s tropicalia, and her trademark rich, distant alto. It also shatters song structure, abruptly changing to another style of music whilst in the middle of a song, like a collage. It’s a sometimes-frustrating album, with moments of brilliance.

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Music Review: The Turtles, 45 RPM Singles Collection

Published on September 26th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Music, Music Reviews, Retrovirus, Reviews |

By Melissa Bratcher

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One of the things that makes listening to music on vinyl different is how much attention must be paid to it. Putting an iPod on shuffle is easy, but not interactive. Listening to an album, or better yet, singles, makes me slow down, sit down, and actually listen to the music. It’s no longer background noise. It’s an experience.

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New Country For Old Men: The Eternal Mystery Of Tim McGraw, Part 1

Published on September 19th, 2014 in: Music, New Country For Old Men |

By Jeffery X Martin

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If you were to ask me what the worst song I’ve ever heard in my entire life is (go ahead; ask me, quietly, just whisper it in your mind), I would tell you without hesitation that Tim McGraw’s “Indian Outlaw” is the Abomination that Causes Desolation, the Thing That Should Not Be, the Final Solution of Country Music.

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Music Review: The Asteroids Galaxy Tour, Bring Us Together

Published on September 19th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Feminism, Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Melissa Bratcher

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Danish pop group The Asteroids Galaxy Tour have returned with a spacey (as one might expect with a name like The Asteroids Galaxy Tour), but still danceable, musical collage that breaks new ground for them and still sticks to their signature style. The duo of singer Mette Lindberg and instrumentalist Lars Iversen makes evocative electronic music that is made warmer by Lindberg’s delightful singing voice. She sings like Björk and Billie Holiday and Christina Amphlett were put in a juicer with a little honey. Kind of.

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Music Review: Utopia, POV (Reissue)

Published on September 19th, 2014 in: Music, Music Reviews, Reissues, Retrovirus, Reviews |

By Jeffery X Martin

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Todd Rundgren’s music has always been an acquired taste. His chart hits have felt like flukes, strange cracks in the system. You aren’t supposed to know who Todd Rundgren is. He leads a cult that resides so far underground, they may as well be Morlocks.

One of the reasons for this status is Rundgren’s musical twitchiness. He jumps from style to style, from Philly white-boy blues to synth-pop, from down and dirty rock and roll to salsa. Never knowing what he’ll do next is exciting for some, laborious for others.

In the late Seventies, Rundgren formed a band called Utopia. It was designed to be his big foray into progressive rock, exploring grand concepts and incorporating deep philosophical lyrics. As it gradually shrank from seven members to four, Utopia became one of the sharpest New Wave bands of its time, delivering perfect three-minute pop songs, deliciously textured with soaring, shifting harmonies.

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Music Review: Stephen Emmer, International Blue

Published on September 19th, 2014 in: Current Faves, Music, Music Reviews, Reviews |

By Melissa Bratcher

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It is difficult to categorize Stephen Emmer’s International Blue (produced by Tony Visconti). It’s an orchestral chamber pop album that showcases some of the finest baritone singers currently in the UK (Ultravox’s Midge Ure, Heaven 17’s Glenn Gregory, Furlined’s Neil Crossley, and Cousteau’s Liam McKahey). It’s not exactly orchestra music, and it’s not exactly pop, but what it really sounds like is a soundtrack for a moody mid-1960s film, the kind where the actors wear amazingly fashionable clothes in primary colors and stare seriously off into the distance. It’s a fine album to mark the slide from late summer into autumn.

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