TADFF Movie Review: Trash Fire

Published on October 28th, 2016 in: Current Faves, Film Festivals, Horror, Movie Reviews, Movies, Reviews |

By Sachin Hingoo

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In his third feature, Trash Fire, Richard E. Bates taps into very visceral discomfort and revulsion in so many ways that it’s disorienting, but uniquely, he largely does it with dialogue rather that with traditional scares or gore. At the same time, Bates mixes in an undercurrent of his particular brand of black humor to ensure that you’re laughing at the most inappropriate situations.
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Podcast: TV or GTFO Episode 8, “Breaker High”

Published on October 21st, 2016 in: Canadian Content, Comedy, Podcasts, Reviews, TV Or GTFO, TV Reviews |

By Sachin Hingoo

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On this episode of TV or GTFO, we’re going to introduce you to a little-known indie actor named RYAN GOSLING, via the extremely Canadian hit (???) series, Breaker High!

Watch as Ryan and his pals sail around the world to several countries (inasmuch as “taping a flag to the wall of a nondescript room” is another country) under the guise of getting an education from a high school on a boat. We ask how these horny kids manage to avoid every STD on the planet while sailing around in what amounts to a petri dish, whether the girls in the cast have telepathic abilities, why there’s a bully on the ship that seems older than any of the teachers, and how anyone could possibly think that dropping a bunch of teenagers into a Japanese monastery would result in any cultural sensitivity whatsoever.

We’re sailing the seven seas with the blandest, Canadianest high school that ever decided to raise the anchor! AND RYAN GOSLING! An ultra-low budget 90210 on a freakin’ boat? GTFO!

Subscribe to us on iTunes or your favorite podcast app, or take a listen right here!

TV Review: Empire S3 E01, “Light Into Darkness”

Published on October 6th, 2016 in: Current Faves, Reviews, TV, TV Reviews |

By Sachin Hingoo

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The life of a Lyon is never easy. Constantly hunted, often abused, and subjected to the threat of confinement. When Season 2 of Empire wrapped up, the Lyon family was in shambles. Hakeem (Bryshere Y. Gray) and Laura’s (Jamila Velazquez) fairytale wedding was broken up by a gun-toting, fight-starting, wasted Shyne Johnson (Xzibit) and Anika (Grace Gealey), still carrying Hakeem’s baby, was subpoenaed to testify against patriarch Lucious. In order to avoid this, Lucious (Terrence Howard) decided to hijack poor Hakeem’s wedding and force his whole family, including Cookie (Taraji P. Henson), to watch him marry Anika, a woman he clearly despises since she can’t testify against him if they tie the knot. Cookie finally swore off Lucious for good, but this predictably lasted about one minute because he’s just that charming. More on that later.
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TIFF 2016 Movie Review: Brimstone

Published on September 30th, 2016 in: Critics/Criticism, Film Festivals, Horror, Movie Reviews, Movies, Reviews, Uncategorized, Upcoming Movies |

By Sachin Hingoo

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Though Westerns are generally not my thing (I consider the genre’s zenith to be 1988’s Young Guns, which is effectively an issue of Tiger Beat in Stetson hats), I was drawn to Martin Koolhoven’s Brimstone on the strength of the cast and early buzz that its extreme content would fit appropriately in TIFF’s audacious Midnight Madness programme, if not for its sprawling running time. In both cases, I wasn’t disappointed. Koolhoven’s script is as heartbreaking and well-acted as it is uncompromisingly brutal and terrifying, and his cast, led by Dakota Fanning and Guy Pearce, execute the difficult material perfectly.
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TIFF 2016 Movie Review: (Re)Assignment

Published on September 23rd, 2016 in: Action Movies, Film Festivals, LGBTQ, Movie Reviews, Movies, Reviews, Upcoming Movies |

By Sachin Hingoo

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When the best thing you can say about a film is that “it’s not quite as transphobic as people are saying”, you know that film has major issues.
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Podcast: TV or GTFO Episode 7, “Pacific Blue”

Published on August 19th, 2016 in: Comedy, Podcasts, Popshifter, TV, TV Or GTFO, TV Reviews, We Miss The Nineties |

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On this week’s TV or GTFO, Sachin and Gary review the extremely 1990s “Baywatch on Bikes” series, Pacific Blue. Running from 1996 to 2000 on the USA Network (also the home of a similar Baywatch ripoff, Thunder In Paradise), this five-season wonder was retooled more thoroughly than the old Raleigh you’ve had since 1988. Did adding ’90s hunkerino Mario “AC Slater” Lopez increase the quality of this show in any measurable way? Spoiler: No it did not!

Does anyone on this show ever talk or react like a human being? Is there any reason to have a bike unit on a beach when bikes can neither traverse sand nor water? Will TC ever put on a shirt? For the love of Pete, will they ever wrap up a storyline properly? Well grab your helmet, put on your teensy shorts, and hop on your ten-speed for Pacific Blue!

Subscribe to us on iTunes or your favorite podcast app, or take a listen right here!

Movie Review: Lucha Mexico

Published on July 27th, 2016 in: Current Faves, Documentaries, Matshifter, Movie Reviews, Movies, Pro Wrestling, Reviews |

By Sachin Hingoo

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The lure of a colourful mask, high-flying and fast-paced energy, and over-the-top characters can’t be denied, even among non-fans of pro wrestling. Lucha libre, Mexico’s own brand of pro wrestling, is an intrinsic part of Mexican culture, and Alex Hammond and Ian Markiewicz’s documentary Lucha Mexico puts this phenomenon on full display, warts and all.

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Podcast: TV or GTFO Episode 6, “The Littlest Hobo”

Published on July 21st, 2016 in: Canadian Content, Comedy, Podcasts, Reviews, TV, TV Or GTFO, TV Reviews |

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On this episode of TV or GTFO, Sachin and Gary take a look at the most Canadian show ever, The Littlest Hobo!

Running from 1979 to 1985, but somehow not aging or changing or evolving in any meaningful way in that time period, this is the story of one dog (or is it multiple dogs?) and his journey to help rural Canadians out of any number of sticky situations over the course of 114 episodes.

Why does Hobo constantly find himself with a gun? Can he successfully co-pilot a helicopter and operate a parachute? Why is he consistently smarter than any human on the show? Is Michael Bay producing a gritty 2020 reboot called “H.O.B.O”? How did they find a bunch of dogs that are better actors than the Olsen Twins? Well grab your hat, travel light, and join us for this week’s episode – HOBO STYLE.

Subscribe to us on iTunes or your favorite podcast app, or take a listen right here!

TV Review: Lucha Underground S02, E22-24, “Ultima Lucha Dos, Part I”

Published on July 19th, 2016 in: Current Faves, Matshifter, Pro Wrestling, TV, TV Reviews, Underground/Cult |

By Sachin Hingoo

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This whole batshit season of Lucha Underground, starting with the rise and fall of Mil Muertes, the introduction of the monster Matanza, and everything in between, has led to this moment. The final three episodes for the year comprise “Ultima Lucha Dos,” Lucha Underground’s season finale, and all the pieces are in place for some wild confrontations.

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Movie Review: Doglegs

Published on June 29th, 2016 in: Current Faves, Documentaries, Matshifter, Movie Reviews, Movies, Pro Wrestling, Reviews |

By Sachin Hingoo

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Doglegs co-founder, and star of the film, Shintaro Yano (ring name “Sambo” Shintaro) strikes a fighting pose. © Alfie Goodrich

Japanese wrestling or “puroresu” is a tradition that goes back to the 1950s, and is most closely associated with a more realistic, hard-hitting “strong style” than we normally see in Western pro wrestling, which is far more choreographed. Strikes usually land for real, though the intention is still primarily to put on a show, not actually hurt one’s opponent. The style is tough on the performers, and those that thrive in the competitive landscape of “puro” are considered some of the best and most resilient wrestlers in the business. Still, the style is often hard to watch, given what we know now about concussions and other injuries that can be commonplace in puro.

You can imagine, then, how hard it is to watch a puro match, not between able-bodied athletes in peak physical condition, but with disabled wrestlers. Heath Cozens’ Doglegs, a documentary about an eponymous group of mostly disabled Japanese wrestlers, is certainly difficult to sit through, but is ultimately worthwhile for its ability to wring triumph from tragedy.

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